Little Eden Book One by KT King

Yesterday, KT King popped over to discuss ME/CSF awareness week. I am pleased to share information and an extract from her first book in the Little Eden series.

Little Eden by KT King

Little Eden Book 1 cover image

Little Eden Book One by KT King

Title: Little Eden

Author: KT King

Publisher: Independent

Release date: 2018

Available here: https://linktr.ee/ktkingbooks

Paperback ISBN: 978-1-9164296-2-8

Kindle ISBN: 978-1-9164296-3-5

Blurb:

2012. Little Eden, London, England.

The beautiful sanctuary town of Little Eden is under threat.

Human greed, selfishness and disregard are about to turn the last 1,000 years to dust.

Robert Bartlett-Hart must make a choice.

With the help his friends (plus plenty of tea and cake), Robert learns that there is more at stake than just Little Eden.

Something lies at the heart of Abbey; something that stands between mankind and Armageddon.

The friends must navigate past lives, other dimensions, and even Heaven itself, to find a way to save Little Eden and themselves.

Will Little Eden survive to usher in a new age, or will humanity perish with it?

Both novels have recipes at the back based on the delectable delicacies served in the No.1 Daisy Place Café-Bookshop such as Strawberry and Cream Shortbreads, Late Night Cheesecake and Over the Rainbow Cake. The E-books have wiki-links and links to YouTube for the soundtrack. You can find everything Little Eden on KT’s Blog www.ktkingbooks.wordpress.co.uk

Look out for…Little Eden, Book Three, Haunted or Not…Available (hopefully) 2021

Excerpt from Chapter 1:

Chapter 1

~ * ~

It was a sad beginning to 2012 for the residents of Little Eden, and as it would turn out, it would not be a good year for the rest of mankind either – but more about that later!

First things first…

New Year’s Day was almost over as Robert Bartlett-Hart sat alone in his library sifting carefully through the mounds of newspapers which were strewn all over a capacious mahogany table. The sombre shadow of dusk began to seep into the clear blue January sky, and all at once multifarious reading lamps, scattered randomly amongst the furniture and piles of books, turned themselves on, in perfect unison. Robert poured another cup of tea from his Kyushu and sighed. He fought, ineffectually, with the oversized, dry, rustling broadsheets, trying to tame them by folding and flattening them the best he could. For posterity, Robert attempted to glue the numerous obituaries into the Little Eden archive (a huge, slightly musty, leather-bound book), but the scissors kept losing themselves amongst the unruly sheets and little scraps of paper kept sticking to his hands; no matter how much he tried to shake them off, they just re-stuck somewhere else!

Robert’s silent contemplation was suddenly shattered by the brusque opening of the library door and his mother’s voice slicing through the peaceful air.

“Did you find the obituary I asked Lancelot to put in the Kolkata Times?” Jennifer Bartlett-Hart asked him. She went straight to the large mirror which hung majestically over the sideboard and began adjusting her black, feather-laden hat. She caught sight of a picture of Lilly on the front page of Tatler magazine which lay amongst many others on the table. The magazine was running an old photograph of the glamorous stage star, Lilly Rose, from 1964. Lilly was posing in a ‘Vivienne Westwood’, wearing white go-go boots, long curling fake eyelashes, and her blond hair was peeking out from beneath a jaunty velvet cap.

The headline read:

“A celebration of the life of a Parisian Diva who became a very English Rose. Lilly Rose D’Or. Her life in pictures: pages 10 – 14.”

Jennifer turned away to look in the mirror again. “Lilly hasn’t been Lilly Rose, star of stage and screen, for decades!” she huffed.  “I doubt she even has any fans left who remember her! All this fuss and for what? She owned a Café for most of her life for goodness sakes and put on far too much weight eating all those afternoon teas. I don’t think that is much of anything to shout about.”

Robert sighed and ran his fingers through his brown tousled hair. “Thousands of people come every year to her charity concerts, Mother, you know that,” he replied. “And she has been a Trustee with us for over twenty-five years, and a friend to us – all my life at least. I don’t know what we would have done without her all these years.”

“I was the most beautiful woman in London once upon a time,” Jennifer replied, tilting the brim of her hat this way and that to make the most of her features. “I don’t suppose I will be on the cover of a magazine when I die. I had to give up any chance of fame to marry your father and have you boys.” Absently, Jennifer picked up a couple of newspaper clippings and added, “I hope you are nearly ready to go? Collins will be here any minute. Did you hear me Robert?” Jennifer looked admiringly at her long, manicured nails. “It’s just one funeral after another these days. It could just have easily have been me.”

“They say only the good die young,” Robert said under his breath, trying, in vain, to get the glue off his hands.

Jennifer took off her hat and rearranged her hair again, scowling into the glass. “I don’t see why your father insisted Lilly be buried with our family. Lillianna Rose D’Or or whatever she wants to be called this season is not family and never will be, and it is embarrassing for me! Your cousin Lancelot insisted on it. He can find a legal loophole when it suits him – but not when it suits me it seems.”

Robert sighed again. “It was in father’s will, Mother; you know there was nothing anyone could do. We have been over and over it.”

Jennifer grimaced, and wiggled her hips to prevent her black skirt from riding up her long, slender legs. “Your father went on about Lilly endlessly whilst he was alive; I never understood it. We always had to do whatever he wanted! What did he ever care about Little Eden? Off he goes to America with that floosy, Christabelle, without as much as a by your leave! Well! I am not going to go to this sham of a ceremony. The whole thing is just to embarrass me!” With that, she launched herself out of the room and slammed the door behind her.

Robert shrugged, and raised a resigned eyebrow as he dolefully drank the rest of his, now cold, cup of tea, and continued to cut and paste. 

After the stomping and the banging of doors had finished, he could hear the sound of his brother, Collins, calling jovially from the hall, “Are you ready?” he called, “Varsity says we’ll be late if you don’t hurry.”

“Varsity can wait!” Jennifer shouted down from the landing. She came tottering back down the stairs wearing a different hat and stiffly kissed her son on both cheeks. “Whoever thought of a memorial service in the evening? I ask you!” she complained.

Jennifer stood on the bottom step of the stairs and started to rearrange her son’s clothing, brushing fluff off his black suit. “This is off the peg!” she said, in disgust. “Where did you get it? The fit is terrible!”

“It’s ‘Lanvin’, Mother,” Collins replied. “Varsity picked it out.”

“I don’t care!” Jennifer replied, straightening his tie. “You have perfectly good bespoke suits. Go upstairs and change. You left an Anderson-Sheppard here last week. Go and put that on. If only Robert had your looks and you had his sense of style – I would be less embarrassed to be seen with you both!”

Collins smiled, and kissed his mother. “The fit is perfect, Mother. Only you would ever notice, no one else will.”

Jennifer snorted. “Well those Lawrence girls certainly won’t notice such details. Lucy dresses dreadfully! They were far too self-confident when they were little girls and I don’t see much improvement over the years.” Jennifer fussed with Collins’ mop of blond hair and he tried to get away from her, afraid she might pull out a hanky and start dabbing his face at any moment! “Robert tells me Sophie isn’t feeling well and is staying at the Café indefinitely. She has some sort of fatigue. I ask you! Tiredness is an illness now, apparently! As if we are not all tired all the time! They are as bad as Lilly and your father with their freedom of speech and their women’s liberation and all that environmental nonsense.  Robert’s in the library. There’s caviar on the sideboard – your favourite.”

Collins nonchalantly kissed his mother again, flung open the large panelled door into the library and headed straight for the champagne and canapés. Collins admired his appearance in the mirror and then, turning to the table, he poked at the papers whilst he munched his aperitifs.

“What’s all this?” he asked, in his usual casual manner.

“The obituaries,” Robert responded, without looking up.

“What all of these? Good god! You would think the woman was a saint.” Collins laughed, nearly choking on a piece of crostini.

“I think she was,” Robert mused. “Or she should be!”

Collins smirked, and looked at Robert in the mirror’s reflection. “I suppose I quite liked the old girl myself,” Collins admitted. “Baked a damn good cake! Shame she’s dead.”

“Shame?” Jennifer retorted, marching through the doorway whilst pinning her third choice of hat on her head. “It’s no shame!” she said, pushing her son aside with her hip. “Move, Collins, I need to look in the mirror! Now, perhaps we can have some of the family money to spend for a change?”

Collins downed another quick glass of champers and said, “Talking of money, Mother, I’m a bit short this month.”

“So am I, my dear. Ask your brother! He holds the purse strings around here. He is the one who won’t let us have our own money! Always spending it on the poor or giving it to a charity. Well! Charity begins at home!”

Wearily, Robert pulled on his long cashmere overcoat and replied soberly, “This is not the time to talk about money.”

“Oh come on Bobby, old boy!” Collins said. “With Lilly out of the picture you can hand out the family fortune a bit more. I promised Varsity she could…” Collins paused and grinned, “F**k! Varsity! I left her in the car. She is probably steaming by now!”

Jennifer surveyed herself in the full-length hall mirror. She smiled at herself again in the looking glass but only until she caught sight of Varsity, who was walking up the front steps wearing a magnificent silver fur coat and looking as if she had just finished a photo shoot for Vogue. Collins rushed out onto the porch, put his arm around his wife’s tiny waist and hastily ushered her back into the car.

Robert escorted his mother to the Bentley. Jennifer slid onto the leather seat and into her best finishing school position. She greeted Varsity with a ‘good evening’ and a ‘you look awfully nice.’ She couldn’t help pouting at Varsity’s youthful beauty. To comfort herself, she checked that her finger nails were still in perfect condition.

As the car passed by the end of Adam Street, the ice on the road was treacherous and Dyson, the chauffeur, was taking it slow. By the time they had reached the old Assembly Rooms, on the corner of Knight’s Walk, Jennifer had run out of things to say, so she began rooting about in her handbag for her hanky, pretending she was unable to find it, whilst Varsity occupied herself by refreshing her lipstick.

Eventually, the car pulled up outside the gates of the graceful gothic Sainte Chappelle. It was a dark winter’s eve, but the street lamps gave a cosy glow to Dovecote Street and softened the harshness of the icy chill in the air. As Jennifer stepped out of the car she cockled over on the curb. Robert caught her just in time before she landed face down on the cobbles! She had expected to see some famous guests outside the Chappelle, but looking anxiously around she was relieved that no one was there. She took Robert’s arm and paraded up the lantern-lined path, to be greeted by the singular Reverend Sprott, who was looking rather chilly, but who had been determined to wait outside, in the high and very ornate porch, to meet and greet the Bartlett-Harts. Robert gladly gave his mother over to the Reverend Sprott’s care.

The Chappelle was full of shadows – peppered with sudden bursts of flickering candle light. The glorious gold leaf of the majestic pillars seemed to be on fire, and the towering cobalt blue windows shimmered in a heavenly dance. The delicate, sweet scent of pale pink roses played amongst the deeper, muskier odour of beautiful bright white lilies. The melange of ancient church odours – a faint dampness of stone, wood polish, and carnal fresh flowers – invoked a shiver of ancient memories in the mourners.

Tonight, this holy and most sacred palace of light played host to the friends and family of Lilly D’Or. Not least, to her two beloved nieces, Lucy and Sophie Lawrence, who were standing by a small table which was covered in flowers, bottles of water and a mound of pink crystals. The sisters had been greeting the many mourners for at least half an hour already.

Author Biography

KT Image

KT King

Many may wonder how I can write novels if I have ME/CFS. I am able to write when I don’t need to do  anything else. The fluctuation of the illness baffles everyone as does the resolve of those with it to battle on trying to make a living. I lost my home, my income and my independence in 2012 coming back to live with my elderly parents on whom I now rely for physical daily help and financial support. By age 40 I had lost the battle with ME.

Writing too much gives me migraines so I can only write a few days a week for about an hour at a time on what is called ‘a good day’. I write through chronic pain and fatigue but it keeps me alive and it keeps me sane.

Mental and emotional health deteriorate for all of us because we can rarely socialise or see friends. We feel we have no purpose or usefulness and many of us are in terrible pain 24/7 with Fibromyalgia which often accompanies ME.

We can either give up or we can try to do something even if it’s just a little thing on ‘a good day’.

Becoming a published writer is a lifelong dream come true and escaping into Little Eden helps keep the suicidal thoughts at bay. I hope it’ll be a beautiful escape place for you too. One of the main things readers say is that they would love to live in Little Eden which makes it all seem worthwhile!

I’m an indie author, using my savings from before 2012 to publish. I can’t meet deadlines of publishers or do the usual sales promotions.

I can spend months, even years unable to get out of bed so I need all the help I can get spreading the word about my books, especially from kind book bloggers like Katie.

I find crafting is good for mental and emotional health so when I can I make handmade jewellery to give to friends and to sell in my Etsy shop where all the gifts inspired by Little Eden. I rarely have the energy to bake but now and again I manage to make a cake or some cookies! Some of my recipes have made their way into the novels.

Come and browse in my little Etsy shop http://bit.ly/KTKingShop

You can follow the global campaign called MillionsMissing and/or KTKing on Twitter.

http://bit.ly/KTKingTwitter

For more information please visit the ME Association website https://www.meassociation.org.uk/about-what-is-mecfs/

For more information on KT and ME why not visit Meet the Author post or yesterday’s raising awareness.

Happy reading!

Love

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Both novels have recipes at the back based on the delectable delicacies served in the No.1 Daisy Place Café-Bookshop such as Strawberry and Cream Shortbreads, Late Night Cheesecake and Over the Rainbow Cake. The Ebooks have wiki-links and links to Utube for the soundtrack. You can find everything Little Eden on KT’s Blog www.ktkingbooks.wordpress.co.uk

 

Look out for…Little Eden, Book Three, Haunted or Not…Available (hopefully) 2021

 

Book review: Chronically Christmas

Spoon Shortage Sue is a blogger who shares her adventures with her followers as she ticks things off her bucket list with her trusty sidekick, Rolo her spaniel. This is her first book on her experiences with living with a chronic illness.

chronically christmas

Title  Chronically Christmas

Author  Spoon Shortage Sue

Genre Auto-biography,  short story

Blurb

A personal journey through chronic illness and disability. Chronically Christmas looks at how Christmas is experienced over a number of years. From first feeling unwell, to being diagnosed. From various treatments to steroid side effects. It’s the story of one woman’s struggle coping with the many different experiences faced when fighting chronic illness.

Spoon Shortage Sue is a mum, wife and assistance dog owner, a retired secondary school teacher, who runs a successful Facebook page – Spoon Shortage Sue & Spoonie Spaniel too. She has fought chronic illness and disability for a number of years and has shared with fellow fighters offering a positive outlook to dealing with the many struggles she and others face.

She also blogs frequently at spoonshortagesue.wordpress.com.

This is her first short story, a personal account of dealing with chronic illness and disability. She is also currently writing a more in depth account which will be published in the new year.

This upbeat short story is a pleasure to read. It is a well written snapshot of chronic illness and follows Sue’s Christmases from pre- diagnosis to the present, from anxieties at being in medical limbo to acceptance and living life to the full. As a follower of Spoon Shortage Sue’s blog it is great to see how it all began. She brings a smile to many daily on FB and wonderful to read her story. 
 

Meet the Author – Tom Seaman

tom-seaman-headshotAbout Tom Seaman

Tom Seaman earned his Bachelors Degree in Elementary Education and Psychology in 1994. After college he pursued private business ventures in the health education field. In 2001, he returned to school to pursue a Masters Degree in Counseling, during which time he developed a painful neurological movement disorder called dystonia. After living many years with debilitating chronic pain and emotional trauma, Tom eventually learned various techniques for better managing his symptoms. In 2012, he became certified as a life/health coach and currently owns a coaching/consulting practice where he helps people work through various life challenges. In 2015, Tom authored and published his book, Diagnosis Dystonia: Navigating the Journey, which has received rave reviews. It has also been recognized by the Michael J. Fox Foundation as one of their suggested resources. In his spare time, Tom writes his own blog and guest blogs, as well as articles for online publications such as The Mighty and Patient Worthy, to educate and raise awareness about dystonia and other chronic health conditions. He is also a support group leader for the Dystonia Medical Research Foundation, serving as co-administrator for their online dystonia support forum. To learn more about Tom and get a copy of his book, as well as links to his articles and videos, please visit www.diagnosisdystonia.com. For information about his life/health coaching services, please visit www.balanceyourlifecoaching.com. Follow him on Twitter @dystoniabook1.

How did you become an author? How I became an author is an unexpected story of many twists and turns. Unlike most people I know who say they want to write a book, it never even dawned on me until a major health issue significantly altered the course of my life. Writing became a form of personal therapy and healing, which then turned into educational and inspirational material for others.

Up until the age of 30, I was enthusiastically enjoying my life when all of a sudden I began to have health problems. A little pain and stiffness in my neck gave way to unrelenting muscle contractions and pain unlike anything I had ever experienced, and it just kept getting worse. After many blank stares at my distorted body from doctors who had no idea what was wrong, I eventually learned that I had a neurological movement disorder called dystonia. In my case it affects my neck, which is called cervical dystonia.

It began in 2001 when I returned to school to obtain my Masters Degree in Counseling after seven years in private business. Due to the severity of my growing dystonia symptoms, I was unable to complete my degree. For the most part, I was completely disabled. I also gained 150 pounds over the course of several years due to my sedentary lifestyle from severe chronic pain. Needless to say, dystonia turned my world upside down, altering the course of my life in ways I never imagined possible.

After numerous unsuccessful treatments and years of physical and mental suffering, I took the bull by the horns and dedicated myself to learning and applying a variety of symptom management techniques that greatly improved my quality of life. In addition to better managing my dystonia symptoms, I lost the 150 pounds I gained. Life as an obese person after previously being a fit, competitive athlete is a book of its own yet to be written.

In 2012 I became certified as a life/health coach, but I was struggling to get my business going. I was still trying to find my bearings from the way dystonia so dramatically altered my life. I felt lost and was starting to wonder about the meaning and purpose of my life. I needed something to get me out of the fog. As crazy as it sounds, one day something inside me said, “write.” The voice was loud and clear. It was almost like a command. I immediately put pen to paper.

As I began writing, I felt more liberated and clear headed. After addressing the most pressing issues, I felt compelled to keep writing and I knew exactly what it had to be about: dystonia. Not only to better understand how to live more effectively with a chronic health condition, but to share with others the things I learned along the way to help them live as high a quality of life as possible.

diagnosis-dystonia-3d-coverTwo years later I published my book, Diagnosis Dystonia: Navigating the Journey. This combination autobiography, self help, education book provides treatment options, coping strategies, skills for daily living, and tools for dealing with the physical and mental challenges of life with a chronic health condition. Serving as a roadmap, this resource covers nearly every physical, emotional, and psychological aspect of living with a chronic condition. The information it contains actually transcends dystonia, making it applicable to any life challenge, health or otherwise.

Although I always enjoyed writing, I never thought I would write a book. It just began to flow as soon as my fingers touched the keys. I actually believe that the book found me, and at the perfect time, as have subsequent writings. Writing gives me a sense of meaning and purpose, especially when someone tells me that something I wrote changed their life. Now that’s pretty cool!!

What is dystonia and where can I learn more? Dystonia is a neurological movement disorder characterized by uncontrollable, involuntary muscle spasms  and contractions, causing repetitive movements, twitching, twisting, and/or abnormal postures. Muscle contractions can be sustained or intermittent and sometimes include a tremor. Dystonia can affect any part of the body, causing varying degrees of disability and pain from mild to severe. For more information, please visit the Dystonia Medical Research Foundation’s website: www.dystonia-foundation.org

What is your favourite book? The Road Less Travelled by M. Scott Peck

Who is your favourite author? Wayne Dyer

Is your writing influenced by the books you have read? In a way I suppose so. I mostly read self help, non-fiction, inspirational, and factual stories, as well as education/reference material, and my book, articles, and blogs are similar in content. However, with my background in social sciences, my main interest is capturing the human element that lies within all facets of life.

Where is your favourite place to read or write? I love to read and write on my back porch in the late afternoon and early evening when the sun is going down and the shadows on the ground are getting longer.

When did you begin writing and how did being published come about?  Ever since I was a little boy I was an avid reader and also wrote a lot of poetry. Although I disliked Language Arts classes in school, it was always my best subject. My book started as a journal for my own personal healing from a life changing health condition. It then expanded into a labor of love in an effort to help others.

If you have a genre you write, how did you begin writing in this style? Most of my writing stems from the chronic health condition I live with, but I also dabble in poetry and free writing that is unrelated.

Has being chronically ill influenced your writing and changed its direction? Most definitely! Each day I feel I gain new perspectives about life with challenges, whether they be my own or others. This provides me with greater understanding and empathy, which impacts the content and flow of my writing. I am always searching for greater connection with people beyond just their illness, as this is just one aspect of their interesting lives.

To learn more about me and my book, as well as my work as a life/health coach, please visit my websites: www.diagnosisdystonia.com and www.balanceyourlifecoaching.com

Book Reviews: Diagnosis Dystonia: Navigating the Journey

“This should be THE resource book for dystonia for many years to come!”

“Must read for dystonia sufferers, doctors, friends, and family.”

“This amazing book exceeds anything out there.”

“An outstanding resource on dystonia.”

“Thank you for your passionate, positive, practical book!”

“Tom has written the definitive book on dystonia.”

“If you have dystonia this is the book for you!”

“Without this book I may have lost my mind!”

“A brilliantly written, honest, and open book.”

“Tom’s book is the best! If you haven’t read it, get it! Read it! Share it!”

 

 

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