Book Review: On a Falling Tide by Georgia Hill

Book Review: On a Falling Tide by Georgia Hill

On a Falling Tide

On a Falling Tide by Georgia Hill

Blurb:

Two women. Connected by heartbreak, separated in time. Can Charity save the man she loves, or will Lydia’s vengeful spirit prove too strong?

Two haunting love stories and a hundred and fifty-year-old curse …

When the beloved grandfather who brought her up dies, Charity is left struggling to cope. Alone and rootless, she’s drawn to the sleepy fishing village of Beaumouth near Lyme Regis and begins to research her family tree. A chance encounter with attractive boat-builder Matt sparks a chain of mysterious and unsettling events and leads Charity to uncover the story of a young girl who lived in the village over a hundred years before.

In 1863 all Lydia Pavey wants to do is follow in Mary Anning’s footsteps and become a ‘fossilist.’ Instead, she is being forced into marriage to a man she barely knows.

Charity’s obsession with Lydia becomes all-consuming and she risks losing everything. With a longed-for family tantalisingly in reach, will Charity find the happy ever after she’s yearned for and, most importantly, can she save the man she loves?

Purchase Links

https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B082334S8K (UK)

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B082334S8K (US)

https://www.blkdogpublishing.com/on-a-falling-tide

My Thoughts

I was attracted to this book for two reasons- I love ghost stories and it mentioned ammonites. I live on the Yorkshire Jurassic coast and when I could I loved walking along the sea shore in the hope I would find some fossils. I was never lucky but my daughter always had the knack of finding them. We have a collection on our window sill to prove it. Lyme Regis has been on our bucket list of places to visit ever since. This novel gave me the chance to visit without leaving the duvet. The atmospheric description of the landscape of the imposing cliffs and sea brought me into the story and I did not want to stop reading until the end.

Chasity is on a sabbatical from work after the death of her grandfather and meets Matt on a fateful walk along the beach. Both characters easy to like and have depth which comes through as the story progresses. The ghostly elements are on the right side of believable adding tension and suspense as Lydia’s tale is revealed. It highlights the challenges of living in a patriarchal society when you are a head strong, independent female scientist in the making. It is an enjoyable spooky escape from reality reliving the excitement of the Victorian fossil hunters.

Author Biography

author pic (1)

Georgia Hill

Georgia Hill writes best-selling romcoms and historical fiction with romance at the heart. Although she writes in two genres, they have more in common than you might think; she puts serious issues into her romcoms and lots of humour into her historical novels. She lives by the sea in the south west of England with her two beloved dogs – a spaniel and a delinquent cockapoo puppy, her husband (also beloved and not at all delinquent) and a ghost called Zoe. She loves Jane Austen, elephants, Belgian chocolate (all donations gratefully received) and Strictly Come Dancing. Her stories come from everywhere and anything, so be careful what you tell her as you may end up in a book. She also finds inspiration in the folklore and history of the many places in which she’s lived. To put it politely, she’s had a portfolio career having worked in the theatre, for a charity and as a teacher and educational consultant before giving in and finally acknowledging that making up things was what she really wanted to do. She has a nasty addiction to moving house but is trying to overcome this. After one house move too many, she lost all her notebooks and decided to stop talking about writing and actually do some. She’s been happily creating believably flawed heroines, intriguing men and page-turning stories ever since.

Social Media Links 

Facebook

https://www.facebook.com/georgiahillauthor?ref=bookmarks

Twitter

https://twitter.com/georgiawrites

Website

www.georgiahill.co.uk

Pinterest

https://www.pinterest.com/georgiawrites/

Giveaway to Win Paperbacks of On a Falling Tide and While I was Waiting. (Open to UK & Ireland)*

Giveaway Prize - ONFTWIWW

Enter here for your chance to win.

Thank you Rachel’s Random Resources for the chance to read this lovely spooky book to review.

Good luck and happy reading!

Love

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*Terms and Conditions –UK & Ireland entries welcome.  Please enter using the Rafflecopter box below.  The winner will be selected at random via Rafflecopter from all valid entries and will be notified by Twitter and/or email. If no response is received within 7 days then Rachel’s Random Resources reserves the right to select an alternative winner. Open to all entrants aged 18 or over.  Any personal data given as part of the competition entry is used for this purpose only and will not be shared with third parties, with the exception of the winners’ information. This will passed to the giveaway organiser and used only for fulfilment of the prize, after which time Rachel’s Random Resources will delete the data.  I am not responsible for despatch or delivery of the prize.

Book Review:The Faerie Tree by Jane Cable

Today I am pleased to share with you The Faerie Tree by Jane Cable. As some of you may know, I love folklore and fairies so I was instantly intrigued by this book by the title alone. It was inspired by a real oak tree in Curbridge, Oxfordshire where locals and visitors write to and place for offerings for the faerie folk. The idea grabbed my attention and I was eager to discover more about this book.

Thank you Rachel’s Random Resources for inviting me to this tour and the copy of The Faerie Tree so I could give my honest, unbiased review.

Book Review:The Faerie Tree by Jane Cable

The Faerie Tree Cover

The Faerie Tree by Jane Cable

Title: The Faerie Tree

Author: Jane Cable

Publisher: Matador

Release date: 16th March 2015

Genre: Fiction

Blurb:

HOW CAN A MEMORY SO VIVID BE WRONG?
In the summer of 1986 Robin and Izzie hold hands under The Faerie Tree and wish for a future together. Within hours tragedy rips their dreams apart.

In the winter of 2006, each carrying their own burden of grief, they stumble back into each other’s lives and try to create a second chance. But why are their memories of 1986 so different? And which one of them is right?

With strong themes of memory, love and grief, The Faerie Tree is a novel as gripping and unputdownable as Jane Cables first book, The Cheesemaker’s House, which won the Suspense & Crime category of The Alan Titchmarsh Shows Peoples Novelist competition. It is a story that will resonate with fans of romance, suspense, and folklore.

Purchase Link

http://viewbook.at/TheFaerieTree

My Thoughts

The fictional Faerie Tree in this novel holds the story together and the mystery surrounding Robin and Izzie first visit kept my attention throughout. I needed to know what happened and the twists in the plot kept me guessing. Robin and Izzie’s lives go in different directions and the dual time line show how their past relationship and experiences affects the one in their present day. The descriptions of the landscapes, especially Cornwall made me long to be there walking along the beach or through the woodland to give my own letter to the tree.

The use of folklore and magic is subtle and cleverly woven into the plot so if you are expecting it to be full of faeries scurrying through the countryside weaving magic then you will be disappointed, but you will not be if you are wanting an emotional read about relationships in all it’s forms – first love, marriage, friends and the bond between mother and daughter. It discusses several difficult topics, such as grief and mental health issues, and false memories in a sensitive, unique way and leaves you questioning your own memories and how they may deviate from the truth.

Would I recommend?

Yes, it is a unusual gentle romance with depth and mystery. All the characters and their flaws will stay with me for a long time.

Author Biography

The Faerie Tree - Jane Cable 2019

Jane Cable

Jane Cable writes romantic fiction with the over-riding theme that the past is never dead. She published her first two books independently (the multi award winning The Cheesemaker’s House and The Faerie Tree) and is now signed by Sapere Books. Two years ago she moved to Cornwall to concentrate on her writing full time, but struggles a little in such a beautiful location. Luckily she’s discovered the joys of the plot walk.

Social Media Links

Twitter: @JaneCable
Facebook: Jane Cable, Author (https://www.facebook.com/romanticsuspensenovels/ )

Giveaway to Win PB copies of The Faerie Tree and The Cheesemaker’s House (UK Only)*

I am excited to share with you the chance to win a copy of The Faerie Tree and The Cheesemaker’s House.

Click here to enter.

Good luck!

Happy reading and stay safe.

Love

*Terms and Conditions –UK entries welcome. Please enter using the Rafflecopter box below. The winner will be selected at random via Rafflecopter from all valid entries and will be notified by Twitter and/or email. If no response is received within 7 days then Rachel’s Random Resources reserves the right to select an alternative winner. Open to all entrants aged 18 or over. Any personal data given as part of the competition entry is used for this purpose only and will not be shared with third parties, with the exception of the winners’ information. This will passed to the giveaway organiser and used only for fulfilment of the prize, after which time Rachel’s Random Resources will delete the data. I am not responsible for dispatch or delivery of the prize.

Spreading the love of Romance: RNA 60th Celebrations and Giveaway

I love all books but those with a romantic thread have a special place in my heart and my forever bookshelf. These are books I can go back to over and over; I visit old friends and come away uplifted despite the trials and tribulations the characters face to reach their happy ending. This is why I am excited to share a new Facebook group with you dedicated to romance fiction which can cover anything from classic bodice ripping novels, emotional family dramas to spooky paranormal stories and nerve wracking thrillers. It is all about the connection between the characters. The Romantic Fiction Book Club aim is to create a warm and cosy place for members to engage with readers, bloggers and authors of romantic fiction.

To celebrate the launch of the group and the 60th anniversary since the Romantic Novelist’s Association was founded they are offering a fantastic giveaway in conjunction with One More Chapter to its members. You could win 60 books – yes 60 romance novels including Four Christmases and A Secret, The Devil’s Bride and the new Milly Johnson’s novel which I am itching to read My One True North.

Have a browse below to see what you could win. The first prize is 60 romantic novels written by RNA authors and there will be 60 runner up prizes of one book. Full details of how to enter are found on the The Romantic Fiction Book Club page.  Click here to join.

More information can also be found in this article written by Jane Cable.

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Click here to enter the competition.

Good luck and maybe I will see you in the book club for some bookish chat.

Love

Book Review: The Devil’s Bride by Emma S. Jackson

I am very excited to be part of this blog tour for The Devil’s Bride by Emma S. Jackson; not only because I love the cover but also because I had the pleasure of meeting her last year and have been looking forward to reading her work ever since. This is her first paranormal romance and I hope it will not be her last.

Book review: The Devil’s Bride by Emma S. Jackson

The Devil's Bride cover

The Devil’s Bride

Title: The Devil’s Bride

Author: Emma S. Jackson

Publisher: DarkStroke

Genre: Paranormal romance

Release date: 6th February 2020

Blurb:

No one goes near Edburton Manor – not since the night in 1668, when demons rose from the ground to drag Lord Bookham’s new bride to a fiery death. Or so the locals say.

That’s what makes it the perfect hideout for the gang of highwaymen Jamie Lorde runs with.

Ghost stories have never frightened her. The living are a far more dangerous prospect, particularly to a woman in disguise as a man. A woman who can see spirits in a time when witches are hanged and who is working hard to gain the trust of the most ruthless, vicious man she has ever known because she intends to ruin and kill him.

But when the gang discovers Matthew, Lord Bookham’s illegitimate brother, who has been trapped by a curse at the Manor ever since the doomed wedding, all Jamie’s carefully laid plans are sent spiralling out of control.

My Thoughts

If I saw this book on a shelf in a store, the striking cover would have drawn me in with its spooky design and I am happy to say it fits the novel perfectly. From the start I found myself immersed in the story by the atmospheric descriptions of the foreboding forest and the haunted house abandoned after the legendary wedding with its demonic guests. Once I met the protagonist, Jamie Lorde I could not stop reading until I knew her story and the outcome of the Highwaymen’s quest. Yes, it was one of those books I stayed up past midnight to read in one sitting. Jamie has a strength, intelligence and courage I admire and is memorable as are the other characters in the book. They all have depth which adds to the richness of the story and they all have secrets which adds to the thrill. The mix of paranormal and historical fiction gives it a delicious Gothic feel and has just the right balance of romance. The constant threat the others in her gang will discover her true sex or her psychic ability adds tension to an already unnerving set of events and the unexpected twists kept me on edge until the satisfying conclusion.

Would I recommend?

Yes, it may only be February but I know this will one of my favourite reads of the year. It made me feel excited about reading and I am pleased to have a copy on my forever shelf to reread in the future. It is everything I want in a paranormal novel and much more. I am looking forward to reading more by this talented author.

Author Biography

Emma Jackson

Author Emma S. Jackson

Emma Jackson is the best-selling author of A MISTLETOE MIRACLE, published by Orion Dash. A devoted bookworm and secret-story-scribbler since she was 6 years old, she joined the Romantic Novelists’ Association on their New Writers’ Scheme at the beginning of 2019, determined to focus on her writing. Her debut novel was published in November 2019. When she’s not running around after her two daughters and trying to complete her current work-in-progress, Emma loves to read, bake, catch up on binge-watching TV programmes with her partner and plan lots of craft projects that will inevitably end up unfinished. THE DEVIL’S BRIDE is her second novel, published by DarkStroke as Emma S Jackson. She hopes to continue working across sub-genres of romance, as she believes variety is the spice of life.

You can follow Emma on

Twitter: https://twitter.com/ESJackson1

Facebook https://www.facebook.com/EmmaJacksonAuthor/

Instagram https://www.instagram.com/emma_s_jackson/

Website www.esjackson.co.uk

Thank you Emma Jackson for an advanced copy so I could give my honest and unbiased opinion.

Happy Reading!

Love

Book Review: Awa and the Dreamrealm – Dreamweavers Book 1

Today I am pleased to share a review for something different – the first book in the Dreamweaver series, Awa and the Dreamrealm by Isa Pearl Ritchie. It is a novel for children and young teens.

Book Review: Awa and the Dreamrealm.

Awa and the Dreamrealm Cover

Title: Awa and the Dreamrealm ( Dreamweavers Book 1)

Author: Isa Pearl Ritchie
Publisher: Te Ra Aroha Press

Genre: Children and young teen fiction

Release date: 23rd Oct 2019

Blurb

What if dreams are more real than waking life?

Life is already complicated enough for Awa Bryant when she starts having weird dreams – waking dreams – and strange coincidences start appearing in her real life.

She meets dreamcharmer, Veila, a quirky glowing creature who helps to guide Awa through the mysterious Dreamrealm.

At first the Dreamrealm is a glorious escape from Awa’s daily struggles but something is not right… Soon Awa discovers she has a bigger quest, and everything she cares about is at stake. Will she be brave enough to face her fears and save her friends?

Purchase Links

UK – https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B07XFHSB9R

US – https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07XFHSB9R

My Thoughts

The blurb caught my attention because I have always had lucid dreams and I was intrigued how the author would entwine this idea into fiction. As the title suggests the novel has a surreal dream like quality to it in many places making it an unusual read.

Awa arrives at a new school following parents divorce and a run in with the school bully adds to her anxiety, triggering nightmares. Reality and her dreams collide but she is guided by the dreamcharmer, Veila on a journey which reminded me of guided meditation and relaxation techniques. As anxiety is increasing in young people, I feel this  story could be a good way to introduce the ideas to them. The theme running through the novel is to trust your intuition and self when facing adversity.

It deals with many issues facing young readers including racism, bullying, divorce, moving and friendship changes in a sensitive and imaginative manner. The interesting concept and character kept me reading and I am curious to see how the story will unfold in the next book in the series.

Would I recommend?

As a mum, I would have given this book to my daughter to read in her preparation to go to secondary school. The topics are age appropriate and much needed but more than that it is a lovely read.

About the Author

Isa Pearl Ritchie

Isa Pearl Ritchie

Isa Pearl Ritchie is a New Zealand writer. As a child, she loved creating imaginary worlds. She has completed a PhD on food sovereignty in Aotearoa. Her second novel, Fishing for Māui, was selected as one of the top books of 2018 in the New Zealand Listener and was a finalist in the NZ Booklovers Award for Best Adult Fiction Book 2019. Awa and the Dreamrealm is her first book for young people.

www.isaritchie.com

Social Media Links –

https://www.facebook.com/isapearlritchie/

https://twitter.com/isapearlritchie

https://www.instagram.com/isapearlritchie/

Giveaway to Win 1 x kindle copy of Awa and the Dreamrealm (INT)

Click here to enter the giveaway

Thank you Rachel’s Random Resources for inviting me to this tour and the opportunity to read an advanced copy to review.

Love

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Frankie: The Woman Who Saved Millions from Thalidomide by James Essinger and Sandra Koutzenco

I am pleased to be part of a blog tour and share with you a book that is on my TBR list Frankie: The Woman Who Saved Millions from Thalidomide by James Essinger and Sandra Koutzenco. Thalidomide caused havoc to many lives and I always assumed it affected many countries so to read a blurb saying this wasn’t the case is fascinating.

Frankie: The Woman Who Saved Millions from Thalidomide by James Essinger and Sandra Koutzenco

Frankie Cover

Title: Frankie: The Woman Who Saved Millions from Thalidomide

Author: James Essinger and Sandra Koutzenco

Genre: History, Medicine, Non-fiction

Publisher: The History Press

Release Date: 28 Jun. 2019

Blurb

Thalidomide: patented in Germany as a non-toxic cure-all for sleeplessness and morning sickness. A wonder drug with no side-effects.

We know differently now.

Today, thalidomide is a byword for tragedy and drug reform – a sign of what happens when things aren’t done ‘the right way’. But when it was released in the 1950s, it was the best thing since penicillin – something that doctors were encouraged to prescribe to all of their patients. Nobody could anticipate what it actually did: induce sleeping, prevent morning sickness, and drastically harm unborn children.

But, whilst thalidomide rampaged and ravaged throughout most of the West, it never reached the United States. It landed on the desk of Dr Frances Kelsey, and there it stayed as she battled hierarchy, patriarchy, and the Establishment in an effort to prove that it was dangerous. Frankie is her story.

Purchase Links

https://www.thehistorypress.co.uk/publication/frankie/9780750991919/

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Frankie-Woman-Saved-Millions-Thalidomide-ebook/dp/B07PQV547Y

https://www.amazon.com/Frankie-Woman-Saved-Millions-Thalidomide-ebook/dp/B07PQV547Y

Author Biography

JAMES ESSINGER is the author of non-fiction books that focus on STEM subjects and personalities, including Charles and Ada (The History Press) and Ada’s Algorithm (Gibson Square), the latter of which has been optioned for a film. He lives in Canterbury.

SANDRA KOUTZENKO is a bilingual writer whose work spans a variety of categories and topics, ranging from French poetry to English non-fiction, focusing on human nature and the conflict between its potential for greatness and its propensity for destruction.

Social Media Links

Twitter @TheHistoryPress

Instagram @TheHistoryPressUK

https://www.facebook.com/james.essinger

https://twitter.com/jamesessinger

Have you read this? Let me know your thoughts below. When I have caught up with my TBR pile I will share my review.

Happy reading!

Love

Book Review: Hallowed Ground: They Mystery of the African Fairy Circles by Paul Twivy

Book Review: Hallowed Ground: The Mystery of the African Fairy Circles by Paul Twivy

There have been downpours of rain outside for days here in Yorkshire so I was more than pleased to be transported to the hot sun in Namibia in the YA novel Hallowed Ground: The Mystery of the African Fairy Circles by Paul Twivy

Hallowed Ground: The Mystery of the African Fairy Circles by Paul Twivy

 

Hallowed Ground Front Cover

Hallowed Ground: The Mystery of the African Fairy Circles by Paul Twivy

Title: Hallowed Ground: The Mystery of the African Fairy Circles

Author: Paul Twivy

Publisher: The Conrad Press

Genre: YA

Release Date: 1st October 2019

Blurb:

This magical story is inspired by the most haunting and least explored country in the world – Namibia – with its foggy Skeleton Coast, buried goldmines, shocking secrets and awe-inspiring sand dunes.

Spread across the face of its deserts are hundreds of miles of ‘fairy circles’ : vast enough to be seen from space.  They grow and die with the same lifespan as humans, yet no-one has been able to explain why or how they appear.

Then one day, three teenagers and their families arrive from different parts of the globe. Helped by bushmen, the buried possessions of a Victorian explorer, and a golden leopard, they solve the mystery of the African Circles. What will be discovered beneath the hallowed ground? And how will it change the future of the planet above it?

Purchase Links

UK – https://www.amazon.co.uk/Hallowed-Ground-mystery-African-Circles-ebook/dp/B07YDY9LF2/

Com – https://www.amazon.com/Hallowed-Ground-mystery-African-Circles-ebook/dp/B07YDY9LF2/

My Thoughts

This is one of those books where the cover matches the story perfectly; it’s vibrant, atmospheric and the desert in Namibia arrives in your living room, bed or wherever you are when you begin to read. It captured my imagination with the visual descriptions and the mystery of the fairy circles.

The four teenagers are distinct from each other with different personalities, backgrounds, cultures and unique talents but their shared curiosity and determination make them work together to solve the puzzle of the circles. Unlike many YA books, the teenagers are not alone on their adventure but have help from their parents who were not just blurry characters on the edges of the story. Theyhad their own fully formed stories and roles to play. It is a format that worked well and made it more believable. Paul Twivy has blended history, folklore, legends and stunning settings to produce a beautiful and unique novel which does not shy away from the horrors of the genocide which affects the country or other sensitive topics. I learnt things I was unaware of reading this.

There are many climate change references and a few older teenagers and adults could view it as didactic but most will nod and agree with the underlying message of protecting and nurturing the environment and our planet now rather than later.

Would I recommend?

This is one of those books which make me happy to be a book blogger. If I hadn’t been invited on to this tour and shown the blurb, this novel would have gone under my radar and I am so glad it didn’t. It reminded me of the books that sat on my twelve year old’s forever shelf and it would have slotted in perfectly.

Author Biography

Paul Twivy

Paul Twivy

Paul Twivy studied English at Oxford University and became one of the most famous British admen. He has written comedy and drama for the stage and radio.  He edited the bestseller Change the World for a Fiver. He is married with five children. He was inspired to write Hallowed Ground by his first-hand experiences of the extraordinary landscapes and culture of Namibia.

Social Media

www.thefairycircles.com

https://hallowedground.co.uk

https://twitter.com/paultwivy

A big thank you to Rachel’s Random Resources and The Conrad Press for the chance to read this delightful book and give my honest, unbiased opinion.

Love

Katie signature pink

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Meet the Author: KT King

Autumn is here which is an ideal time to curl up under the duvet and read a good book.  My TBR pile is on the edge of falling over but one of the books I am eager to read is Little Eden.  I have the pleasure to introduce its author, KT King to my blog today to discuss this novel, her favourite reads and her experience of writing with ME/CFS.

Little Eden by KT King

9781916429604

Little Eden by KT King

Book Blurb

  1. Little Eden, London, England.

In the heart of the city lies the beautiful sanctuary of Little Eden. In the time of King Alfred, this sacred site was surrounded by stone walls and within their protection has grown a tranquil town of historic buildings, parks and gardens, and tree-lined streets.

But, Little Eden and the last 1,000 years of community, compassion and refuge are under threat. Human greed, selfishness and disregard are about to turn everything Little Eden stands for to dust.

Robert Bartlett-Hart must make a choice.

With the help of his friends – plus plenty of tea and cake – Robert learns that there is more at stake than just Little Eden. Something lies at the heart of the Abbey; something that stands between the future of mankind and Armageddon.

Robert sets out on a journey of self-discovery, through past lives, other dimensions, and even through Heaven itself, but where do his loyalties lie?

Will Little Eden survive to usher in a new age or will humanity perish with it?

https://linktr.ee/ktkingbooks

The paperback will be available shortly.

Welcome to From Under the Duvet, KT King. Please tell us a bit about yourself.

_MG_0566 - Copy

KT King

KT:  I love afternoon tea, investigating all things spiritual and work as a complimentary therapist (when my health allows). I try to help others as much as I can. Making a contribution to someone else’s happiness or healing is the only thing that keeps me going! I also love crafting, up-cycling and a bit of shabby chic! I sell some of my handmade jewellery in my Little Eden Etsy shop where all the gifts inspired by Little Eden. I meditate daily and I eat way too much chocolate! I can’t read a lot these days but I chill out by watching TV adaptations of cosy crime novels.

I hope to help raise awareness for ME/CFS through my writing. I have suffered with this little known but chronic illness for over 25 years. My heroine, Sophie Lawrence, represents all of us with this illness. I hope that she inspires others as well as helping raise awareness for the millions of us worldwide who are currently ignored by the medical profession and society. There are so many people now suffering with this debilitating illness that it has been suggested that it is becoming a humanitarian crisis. If you would like to learn more about ME/CFS just click here: https://www.meaction.net/

What is your favourite book?

KT:  This is always a hard question to answer as I think we all have a few books which we turn to over and over for comfort or enlightenment. One book I have read many times is Maurice by E.M Forster, I remember reading it aged seventeen in one sitting.

Who is your favourite author?

KT: Again, a tricky question to pin down to one author but I would have to say Jane Austen, as I always dip into her books when I am feeling down.

Is your writing influenced by the books you have read?

I studied English and French at University and am influenced by French authors such as Andre Gide but also by English Gothic writers such Edgar Allen Poe and Shirley Jackson. I like to mix up my genres so you’ll notice a splash of all sorts in my writing. I’m very influenced by TV and Film as well. I see my scenes in pictures before I write them down. I love the cinematography of Hitchcock, Baz Lurhmann and Tim Burton for example, and I weave music into my novels just as they do in the movies!

Where is your favourite place to write?

KT: I have a therapy room where my desk is actually my treatment couch, I love it in there as it’s so peaceful, tranquil and calming. Sometimes I write in our ‘fancy shed’ if the weather is warm. My dream place to write would be by a lake somewhere in Canada or Scandinavia.

When did you begin writing?

KT: I used to play at being Enid Blyton when I was six years old and invent stories for my friends to act out and I loved Anne of Green Gables and Little Women – wanting to be Anne or Jo. I wrote the sixth form play but then all my writing after that was essays, newsletters or course manuals. Due to the CFS I didn’t have the energy to do anything outside my part-time work as a healer/psychic.

When I had a massive relapse of the CFS aged forty, I was in bed for two years and began to write Little Eden in my head. It took me four years to type it up as I had long periods of not being able to function. But, I feel I’ve been writing in my head my whole life long!

Katie: Jo and Anne are tow of my childhood heroines and both encouraged me to dream about being an author.

How did you become published?

KT: I finally self-published in November 2018 taking a leap of faith that my writing was good enough to be out there in the ocean of books but also because I didn’t want the ‘what if’ following me around for the next forty years. Due to the CFS a publishing deal would not really work for me as I can’t meet deadlines and my writing days are short and erratic. Self-publishing offers the challenge of how to promote my books because I don’t have the energy or the time for major marketing. It is thanks to wonderful, generous bloggers like Katie that you are reading about me and Little Eden right now.

If you write a particular genre, how did you begin writing in this style?

KT: Little Eden can’t be pinned down to one genre because I’m too curious to stick to one style. I like to have fun and mix it up! I guess you could say Little Eden is part supernatural thriller, part cosy crime, part women’s fiction with some mind, body, spirit, someone once said it was like Jane Austen meets Gothic thriller and I like that because one of my favourite books is Northanger Abbey which is a satirical Gothic romance!

Social Media links for KT King:

Blog: http://bit.ly/KTKingBlog

Website: http://bit.ly/KTKingWebsite

Instagram:  http://bit.ly/KTKingInstagram

Facebook: http://bit.ly/KTKingFacebook

Twitter:  http://bit.ly/KTKingTwitter

Etsy: http://bit.ly/KTKingShop

Thanks KT King for joining us today. It is always nice to meet fellow duvet dwellers and discover new books too. Good luck with the novel and your future writing.

Happy reading.

Love

 

 

 

Book Review: The Lost Daughter by Sylvia Broady

Book Review: The Lost Daughter by Sylvia Broady

This is my second review this month from a local author though Sylvia Broady writes a different genre to the last. The Lost Daughter is classed as a saga which I rarely read but when I read the blurb, I was desperate to read it. Scroll down to see what I thought.

Book Review: The Lost Daughter by Sylvia Broady

The Lost Daughter Cover

The Lost Daughter

Title: The Lost Daughter

Author: Sylvia Broady

Genre: Saga, Women’s fiction

Publisher: Allison and Busby

Release Date: 22nd November 2018

Blurb

Hull, 1930. A terrified woman runs through the dark, rain-lashed streets pursued by a man, desperate to reach the sanctuary of the local police station. Alice Goddard runs with one thing in her mind: her daughter. In her panic she is hit by a car at speed and rushed to hospital. When she awakes, she has no memory of who she is, but at night she dreams of being hunted by a man, and of a little girl.

As the weeks pass and her memories gradually resurface, Alice anxiously searches for her daughter, but no one is forthcoming about the girl’s whereabouts – even her own mother is evasive. Penniless and homeless, Alice must begin again and rebuild her life, never giving up hope that one day she will be reunited with her lost daughter.

Purchase Links

From 22nd – 29th August, The Lost Daughter will be at the bargain price of 99p.

Amazon UK – https://www.amazon.co.uk/Lost-Daughter-Sylvia-Broady-ebook/dp/B07F3KPN1J

Amazon US – https://www.amazon.com/Lost-Daughter-Sylvia-Broady-ebook/dp/B07F3KPN1J

My Thoughts

I loved this book in many ways – the style, voice, time frame, and locality of the setting but mainly the story. I am a huge fan of The Long Lost Family, a British TV programme where relatives find those separated by adoption, trauma and other turns of life. The real life stories are fascinating and heartbreaking; ideal inspiration for writers. A box of tissues is needed throughout. If the novel was based on a true story it could easily be featured in this series.

The blurb caught my imagination but the main character, Alice Goddard captured my heart and as her story developed I had to keep reading. She is everything I would like to be – kind, compassionate, determined and strong. This novel is an emotional journey of a woman’s life and the search for her child, Daisy. Beginning in 1930’s it is believable that a child could easily get lost in the care system at a time when the stigma of being classed as an unfit mother ran deep and there was little compassion in the authorities.  My heart broke reading the accounts of both characters missing each other. The outbreak of the Second World War adds further emotion and take Alice to places beyond her imagination.

This well researched book opened my eyes to the realities of war on the home front as well as the unsung heroes of the nurses. The location of Hull, East Yorkshire gave this book more meaning as it is a city I have recently discovered. When there I am always intrigued by the many beautiful buildings and quirky architecture mingled between the modern ones. It brought home to me how much must have been lost and the true devastation the place and its people endured during the blitz. The novel also touches on other local places such as Bridlington and Scarborough, so every time I visit them I can visualise Alice and others walking close by.

Would I recommend?

Yes, The Lost Daughter will proudly sit on my forever shelf. It has rekindled my love for sagas and made me realise how much I enjoy learning about the changes in society and lives of people in history through fiction. You see the growth of a person over a longer time span than other genres which tend to provide you a quick snapshot of the protagonist’s life.

I am looking forward to Sylvia Broady’s future releases and her previous books have been added to my TBR list.

Author Biography

Sylvia Broady was born in Kingston upon Hull and has lived in the area all her life, though she loves to travel the world. It wasn’t until she started to frequent her local library , after World War 2, that her relationship with literature truly began and her memories of war influence her writing, as does her home town. A member of the: RNA, HNS, S of A and Beverley Writers. She has had a varied career in childcare, the NHS and East Yorkshire Council Library Services, but is now a full-time writer. Plus volunteering as a Welcomer at Beverley Minster to visitors from around the world, and raising money for local charities by singing in the choir of the Beverley Singers, both bringing colour and enrichment to her imagination and to her passion for writing.

Social Media Links

Facebook https://www.facebook.com/SylviaBroadyAuthor

Twitter https://twitter.com/SylviaBroady

Website: https://sylviabroadyauthor.com

Giveaway

I am pleased to share a chance for you to win 2 x paperback signed books of The Lost Daughter and The Yearning Heart (Open Internationally).* Good luck.

Click here to enter

The Lost Daughter GIVEAWAY 3

Giveaway Prizes

Thank you Rachel at Rachel’s Random Resources and Sylvia Broady for the advanced copy of The Lost Daughter so I could give my honest, unbiased opinion. If you life to find out more about Sylvia Broady and her book,why not visit other blogs on this tour.

Happy reading!

Love

The Lost Daughter Full Tour Banner

*Terms and Conditions –Worldwide entries welcome. Please enter using the Rafflecopter box below. The winner will be selected at random via Rafflecopter from all valid entries and will be notified by Twitter and/or email. If no response is received within 7 days then Rachel’s Random Resources reserves the right to select an alternative winner. Open to all entrants aged 18 or over. Any personal data given as part of the competition entry is used for this purpose only and will not be shared with third parties, with the exception of the winners’ information. This will passed to the giveaway organiser and used only for fulfilment of the prize, after which time Rachel’s Random Resources will delete the data. I am not responsible for despatch or delivery of the prize.

Book Review: The Woman in the Photograph by Stephanie Butland

This book has been on my radar for a while so I was pleased when I had a gap in the blog tours to read something purely for me. It was stunning, and left me reeling with emotion by the time I closed the book. Scroll down to find out why.

Book Review: The Woman in the Photograph by Stephanie Butland

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The Woman in the Photograph

Title: The Woman in the Photograph

Author: Stephanie Butland

Genre: General fiction (it is classed as Women’s Fiction but should be aimed at all genders)

Publisher: Bonnier Zaffre

Release Date: 11th July 2019

Blurb:

1968.

Veronica Moon, a junior photographer on a local paper in an Essex town, is frustrated. She never gets good assignments, and no one takes her seriously. And then she visits the picket line at Dagenham Ford Factory. At the front line of the fight for equal pay for women workers she meets Leonie – a privileged, angry activist, ahead of her time and prepared to fight for equality with everything she has. Veronica is captivated. She breaks off her engagement and moves to London with Leonie to begin a game-changing career and an intoxicating friendship.

Fifty years later and Leonie is gone. Veronica is a recluse with a crippling degenerative disease. For a while she was heralded as a pioneer, leading the charge for women everywhere. But her career was shockingly and abruptly ended by one of the most famous photographs of the twentieth century. It is a photograph she took of her best friend’s death.

Now, as that controversial picture hangs as the centrepiece of a new feminist exhibition curated by Leonie’s niece, long-repressed memories of Veronica’s extraordinary life and tumultuous, passionate and – at times toxic – friendship begin to stir.

It’s time to break her silence and step back into the light. And she will no longer hide from the truth about that dark time . . .

My Thoughts

This book blew me away. It is intelligent, thought-provoking, emotional (to the point I sobbed in front of my in-laws) and got under my skin.

It is a retrospective look on the second wave of feminism through the eyes of Veronica Moon, a photographer as she becomes involved in an exhibition of her work over the previous fifty years. Set in 2018, the interaction between her and the exhibition’s organiser, Erica drew me in and highlights the differences in attitude between generations and how feminism has evolved from the 1970’s marches to the #MeToo movement.

Veronica, Vee did not know anything about feminism until she met bolshie, educated and opinionated Leonie in 1968. Through the relationship and Leonie acting as a mentor, Vee evolves and learns about her place in the world and the fight for equality ahead. Vee’s learning curve became my own because it made me realise how little I knew beyond the suffragettes and Dagenham. It was eye opening to read about the restrictions on women at the time, many I did not know about such as needing a guarantor to take a mortgage out on your own. There are many things we take for granted that the older generation had to fight for. Likewise in the present day, Vee becomes Erica’s mentor who until then saw feminism much like did.

The novel as the title suggests revolves around photographs; Stephanie Butland’s talent for describing them brought the images alive adding to the depth of the story. Throughout the story, there is a mystery of a particular image of Leonie which made me keep turning the pages.

Feminism plays a large role in this novel but at it’s heart is the journey of women, and an exploration of the relationships between them, their families, spouses and wider world.

Would I recommend?

Yes, it is one I would like to shout about and if I was still working in the library I would be urging people to give it ago. I have read some of Stephanie Butland’s books before and loved them, especially Lost in Words but this is special; Leonie, Vee and Erica will remain in my heart. Their voices will continue speak to me urging me to follow their lead, keep fighting to make a difference, be proud of who I am and what I achieve, support fellow sisters and always question the world around me. It left me feeling empowered and I am not the same person I was when I read the opening paragraph. This is definitely one for my forever shelf.

This book has encouraged me to read some books exploring feminism. I would love some recommendations so feel free to comment below.

Love